Great Outdoors

Arts & Culture (12)
Gardens (23)
Great Outdoors (29)
Heritage (40)
Special Interest (57)
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Bayards Cove

Bayards Cove

Bayard's Cove in south Devon is the oldest part of Dartmouth's harbour side. The cobbled quayside here served as an anchorage for the Mayflower during its journey in 1620 to the New World. Seats on the cobbles make for a lovely place to sit and enjoy the view of the river Dart. There is an artillery fort beside the quay, Bayard's Fort, built in 1534 to defend the harbour against ships which might have got beyond Dartmouth Castle.

 

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor is dominated by dramatic granite tors which tower over the sweeping expanses of open moorland. First farmed over 4000 years ago by bronze age settlers Bodmin Moor is of one the last great unspoilt areas in the South West and much of its prehistoric and medieval past remains untouched by the passing of the centuries.

 

Braunton Burrows

Braunton Burrows

Braunton Burrows is the largest sand dune system in the UK. It hosts an extraordinarily diverse plant community, with over 400 recorded species of vascular plants. This in turn means that there are also a great variety of associated invertebrate species. Its uniqueness and biodiversity is recognised in its designation as both a National Nature Reserve and as a UNESCO biosphere reserve. Braunton Burrows is located in the South West of England, in North Devon, to the west of the town of Barnstaple.

 

Cerne Abbas Giant

Cerne Abbas Giant

180ft chalk figure carved into the hill side. There has been much speculation regarding his origin and some believe he is 1500 years old and may represent the Roman God Hercules

 

Corfe Castle

Corfe Castle

Corfe Castle, both as a village and a castle, is located on the A351 between Wareham and Swanage in Dorset. The area is popularly known as the Isle of Purbeck. Visitors, for some part of the year, can also enjoy a steam train ride on The Swanage Railway which presently runs from the Norden Park & Ride just outside Corfe Castle to Swanage without the hassle of finding parking in Swanage itself. There is also a station at Corfe Castle.

 

Dartmoor National Park

Dartmoor National Park

Dartmoor was designated one of the National Parks of England and Wales in 1951. It is a beautiful moorland landscape with wooded valleys and wind swept Tors. 368 square miles (953 sq. km.) in area, with about 33,000 people living in it, and where about 10 million visits are made each year. Dartmoor is a rich habitat for wildlife and has a wealth of archaeological remains.

 

Discover Scilly’s ancient sites on St. Mary’s

Discover Scilly’s ancient sites on St. Mary’s

Scilly’s resident archaeologist, Katharine Sawyer, offers a fascinating insight into prehistoric Scilly. Guests are taken by taxi or minibus to start a 2.5 hour walking tour to the amazingly well-preserved Bant’s Carn (Bronze Age tomb) and Halangy Village, an Iron Age settlement that continued in use for about 500 years right up to the Roman period. The tour then takes the coastal path back to Hugh Town via Harry’s Walls, an unfinished artillery fort built in 1551. The views across to St Martin’s, Tresco and Samson are stunning.

 

Durdle Door

Durdle Door

Part of the Jurassic Coast, Durdle Door is one of the most photographed and filmed areas along the south west coast.

 

Exmoor National Park

Exmoor National Park

Situated in the south west of Britain, Exmoor National Park contains an amazing variety of landscapes within its 267 square miles. A unique landscape of moorland, woodland, valleys and farmland, shaped by people and nature over thousands of years. Where high cliffs plunge into the Bristol Channel, and cosy pubs and tearooms offer delicious local produce. Stroll along the tranquil Heddon Valley to the sea at Heddons Mouth. Enjoy views of sea & beach before returning to Hunters Inn and a pub lunch. Or visit Countisbury, a tiny hilltop settlement with a church, old coaching inn and car park. There are superb walks on the Foreland, with views down Countisbury Hill to Lynmouth, to the Iron Age rampart on Wind Hill, and along the cleave above the spectacular wooded East Lyn gorge.

 

Glastonbury Tor

Glastonbury Tor

This iconic and evocative landmark offers magnificent views of the Somerset Levels, Dorset, Wiltshire and Wales. Steeped in history and legend, excavations at the top of the Tor have revealed the plans of two superimposed churches of St Michael, of which only a 15th-century tower remains. Glastonbury Tor also has a grisly past. Abbot Richard Whiting was executed here in 1549 on the orders of Thomas Cromwell, the first Earl of Essex. Glastonbury Tor is known as being one of the most spiritual sites in the country. Its pagan beliefs are still very much celebrated. It’s a beautiful place to walk, unwind and relax.

 

Guided Wildlife Walk – Bryher

Guided Wildlife Walk – Bryher

Get to know Scilly’s smallest inhabited island on a walk with one of the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust’s Ranger team. On this gentle tour, you will encounter a variety of rich habitats and some stunning scenery, while learning about what life is like on this tiny island for both people and wildlife. Hear about the Island’s deadly history of shipwrecks, keep your eyes peeled for sea birds as you discover heathland, lagoons and bays and relax in Bryher’s peaceful café.

 

Guided Wildlife Walk on St Mary’s

Guided Wildlife Walk on St Mary’s

The Isles of Scilly are teaming with marine and bird so what better way to make the most of this than with a guided wildlife walk with a member of the Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust’s Ranger team? This guided tour starts with a morning walk around the stunning Peninnis Head to the South point of St Mary’s, where you’ll encounter unique natural sculptures.

 

Hardy Monument

Hardy Monument

On a hill near Portesham with glorious views across the Dorset countryside to the sea, stands a monument, erected in 1844 to commemorate Vice Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, Flag Captain of HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. Most famously known as Nelson’s ‘Kiss me Hardy’. More information and port distances

 

Helford River

Helford River

A delightful unspoilt estuary stretching from the outer edge of Falmouth Bay up to the old port of Gweek. On the north bank the beautiful valley gardens of Glendurgan and Trebah lead down to Durgan village and Polwigwidden Cove; famous for its part in the D-day embarkation.

 

Hillsborough Fort

Hillsborough Fort

Hillsborough is a Local Nature Reserve in Ilfracombe, and is known locally as the sleeping elephant. It is also the site of an Iron Age Hill fort on a Promontory at approximately 115 metres above sea level. The Ordnance Survey Map of Britain in the Iron Age shows the Hillsborough fort. The South West Coast Path runs over Hillsborough and provides stunning viewpoints from which to see the rugged coast line, and marine mammals such as seals and porpoise. There is a network of paths on Hillsborough providing the perfect opportunity to explore.